Hogeschool van Amsterdam

AUAS Library

One year of access to the largest databases

Enrich research and teaching materials with Scopus and Web of Science

1 Mar 2021 09:39 | HvA Library

Have you already used the Scopus and Web of Science databases? As of 1 January this year, the Library has one year's access to both databases.

In 2021, the Library is licensed to access both the Scopus database and the Web of Science database, which are suitable for most researchers and lecturers thanks to their broad scope. At the end of the year, an evaluation will take place to assess the use of the databases. Based on this evaluation, the Library will decide whether extending access is necessary. Will you be working with the new databases this year?

What does Scopus offer?

The Scopus database is published by Elsevier and contains around 75 million descriptions of scientific articles. Some of these are open access, and so are free of charge and freely available. The database is mainly oriented towards the exact and natural sciences (i.e. STEM). Other Scopus facts and figures:

  • Data is available on 16 million authors.
  • The database contains 1.4 billion citations.
  • Nearly 25,000 current journals are made accessible.

Tip: You can use the handy AUAS link provided in the search results list. If an article is available in the AUAS collection, the AUAS link refers to it from the database, so you will no longer need to search the Library collection yourself.

What does Web of Science offer?

Many of you probably already know Web of Science (WoS). The Library already had access to this database, but since 1 January this has been further expanded. Web of Science is a database created by Clarivate Analytics, an independent publisher, and contains some 170 million article descriptions from the entire spectrum of science (including the humanities). Open access versions of a large proportion of the (full) articles in this database are also available. Other facts and figures about the database:

  • Thanks to the 1.9 billion citations, you can see how often an article has been cited, and will also have access to links to the articles citing it.
  • Web of Science also offers tools like Journal Citation Reports.

Tip: You can use the handy AUAS link provided in the search results list. If an article is available in the AUAS collection, this AUAS link refers to it from the database, so you will no longer need to search the Library collection yourself.

Questions or remarks?

This year the Library is investigating the interest in Scopus and Web of Science. Would you like to share something about this topic, or do you have any other questions or remarks about the databases? Let us know via Ask the Library.